Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 101
FOXNEWS 26
KPIX (CBS) 13
WJZ (CBS) 12
WUSA (CBS) 7
CNN 6
KGO (ABC) 4
KNTV (NBC) 4
WBAL (NBC) 4
WRC (NBC) 4
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 188
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)
recommended bed in america. >>> new nuclear fears in japan. officials say a partial meltdown is likely happening now and multiple meltdowns are a real possibility. >>> unbelievable amateur video at the moment the tsunami hit. water pouring in, flooding cars and everything in its way in miyako, japan. more amazing pictures next. hi, everybody. great to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. this is the continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. it's 12 noon in the east and 2:00 a.m. monday in japan. three major stories developing now in that country. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he says the earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, workers at a nuclear power plant hit by the earthquake and tsunami are trying to keep temps down to prevent the disaster from grewing worse. the escalating crisis includes the threat of multiple meltdowns. >>> more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people tested positive for high ra
for fitting us in. >>> and more on the disaster in japan straight ahead on "the daily rundown" with chuck and savannah, right now. >>> overnight, japan is reeling after the largest earthquake in its recorded history. it now pushes a tsunami across its shores and reports of several hundred are killed as the water sweeps away ships, vehicles, buildings, sparking fires, devastating coastal communities, and even threatening some nuclear plants over there. meanwhile, on this side of the pacific, waves are blanketing things, it's hitting hawaii this past hour and the west coast is now bracing for an impact later this morning. we have live reports. and we're going to hear from fema director right here ondale rundo daily rundown. >> let's get to the rundown. we will start with the breaking news out of japan. a catastrophic 8.9 earthquake in japan today. the largest earthquake in japan's recorded history. the latest death poll, the ap is reporting japanese police saying 200 to 300 bodies have been found in the northeastern coastal area. the quake sent tsunami waves barreling across the pacific, co
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: japan deals with environmental crisis following the earthquake and tsunami. will potential nuclear disaster there affect growing reliance for energy over here? and republican leaders try to keep the members in line long enough to avoid a government shutdown. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. japan is coping with multiple disasters tonight. the japanese prime minister says if the catastrophe unseen since the end of world war ii. millions of people have little or no food, water, or heat in the freezing temperatures. following friday's earthquake and tsunami. nearly 1900 are confirmed dead but estimates for a final tally run much higher, with thousands more missing. explosions and exposed fuel rods at nuclear facilities heightened fear of full-scale meltdown. correspondent adam housley is in japan tonight. >> fears of a worst case scenario grip a nation that's shaken and battered from friday's 9.0 earthquake, subsequent tsunami and continual aftershocks. n
in japan. this is new video of when the powerful tsunami hit. watch this. a tsunami wave swallowing up this town. water rushing over homes, sending them splintering into pieces. over on top of their buildings. homes ripped from their foundation sending down a river of destruction. that's awesome in its powerfulness to watch. fears of a nuclear meltdown after this explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear plants. they continue yet again today. good morning. good to have you along with us. welcome, allison. >> the images out of japan are jaw dropping. this is a buddhist temple rocking back and forth from the sheer jolt of the quake. rescue and relief efforts are now underway. millions of people are left without food, water and electricity for days. japanese officials near thousands of people may be dead. bill: we have julian from sendai in northern japan where the tsunami came onshore near this nuclear power plants. what's the latest from there? >> i have been down by the sendai airport watching the japanese military collecting body parts from the paddy fields around the airport. the power
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
with us. more politics ahead with ce cenk uyger. >>> good evening. in a moment we'll go live to japan to cover the historic disaster there. but also on tonight's show, president obama hits back hard at republicans who are trying to blame him for rising gas prices. who's right and who's wrong? we actually have the proof. and we'll expose the republicans' war on education around the country with former pennsylvania governor ed rendell. but we begin with a powerful earthquake that struck northeastern japan. we're just getting the first live pictures of damage in the daylight in japan. you're seeing it right there. request y-- you see people hanging out on the roof there. lower ground is dangerous, higher ground is safer. you see whole sections of town cities, buildings, et cetera, devastated. and the earthquake was an 8.9 magnitude quake and it struck near the coastal city of sendai overnight. it's the largest ever recorded in japan. sky scrapers started shaking and people went running for their lyes. witnesses say the reverberations were so powerful and prolonged they got motion sicknes
. >> a fox urgent, nuclear crisis in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live with a special edition of fox report. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and frantically trying to cool down the reactors with sea water and are' looking at the two plants in question, fukushima where there's been at least one explosion and the other, where we're getting word now radiation levels have dropped back to normal after what they're doing there for the problem. japan's prime minister speaking about friday's twin disasters, the earthquake and tsunami and now the nuclear threat. his words through a translator. >> 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughers and most difficult for japan in that period. >> harris: we're just starting to get some satellite images. this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before on the left side of the screen and after. you can see how a torrent of tsunami driven mud ripped through the covered ground here. the government confirming now more than 2500 buildings in that city destroyed. scientists have just revised their estimates now how big that earth
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
and worsening nuclear crisis in japan. another explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear power plant that is about 170 miles north of tokyo. and it is now feared a third reactor will explode. officials say fuel rods appear to be melting right now in all three troubled reactors. all of this, of course, raising concerns more radiation will be released. the u.s. military moves some of its fleet further from japan's shore after some of the uss ronald reagan carrier group were exposed to a cloud of low-level radiation, this as authorities try to cope with the disaster. officials say another 1,000 bodies washed up today along japan's earthquake and tsunami ravaged northeast coast. so far 2,800 people confirmed dead. but as you well know by now, the final death toll is expected to increase to as many as possibly 10,000 the people. chris jansing joins us live from tokyo regarding the nuclear crisis. at the top of the hour i pointed out a japanese official is saying we are likely seeing melting at the plant that's been so much focused on. >> reporter: what we've had is for a second time a fuel rod explode
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
you next fox news sunday. >> a fox urgent tsunami warning issued for japan. after a 6.5 magnitude earthquake has hit off shore. this coming from the japan meteorology agency, the tsunami could be 1.6 feet and as we know, the size is deceiving when it comes in and how the wave comes in and how much it can take when it goes back out. dominique dei-natale with the latest on this. >> reporter: harris, it happened just 30 minutes ago. the details we have at the off the coast, which is supposed to be fukushima nuclear plant having the problems from the results of the tsunami and earthquake. and taking the height, 1.6 as well, but it's not about the height of the wave it's actually the back distance of the wave, how high it is, and goes back, and the force that it will bring it it hits shore. we haven't had confirmation whether the tsunami has happened, but probably in at that area, as result of the march tsunami. the wave touched in and big enough (inaudible) it will just drag even more around and the recovery process going on up there, particularly difficult. and where the united stat
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
official here in the united states says that the primary containment structure of those reactors in japan, it looks like has breached. it raises the risk now of a further release of radioactive material. let's go right to tokyo now. msnbc chris jansing is standing by. i received a note the winds have shifted and are blowing over the pacific sxnt over tokyo. i'm sure people there are very concerned. >> reporter: it's been a very concerning situation because there have been levels, low levels i need to emphasize that of radiation here in tokyo. it has caused enough of a red flag that the french government has advised its citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially peop
on the mounting nuclear crisis in japan, authorizing the first evacuations of american government employees out of the country. in addition, the state department is warning all u.s. citizens to consider leaving japan. the unpredictable weather conditions risks spreading radioactive material. that move comes as japanese crews and military helicopters brave radiation to dump sea water on to the stricken fukushima complex. the tactics are an attempt to cool overheated radium fuel that may be on the verge of spewing out more radiation. meanwhile, plant operators say they're racing to finish a new power line that could restore cooling systems and ease the crisis. still, the top u.s. nuclear regulatory official is warning american citizens within 50 miles of the complex to leave the area or at least remain indoors. testifying on capitol hill yesterday that the situation is "very serious." >> we believe that there is no water in the spent fuel pool known as number four. i would say that it is my great hope that the information that we have is not accurate. i would hope for the sake of everyone that th
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
: i'm heather childers. rescue workers in japan facing continuous aftershocks and latest on the search for survivors. >> gregg: total door entangling, the death toll rising in the new york bus crash. the search for the person that may be responsible. >> heather: and rebels in libya losing ground because muammar khadafy's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where
unbelievable stories of survival. those are coming out of japan. we'll share them with you. >>> plus, what do you do if you share the house speaker's trademarked orange glow? if you're like this guy, you become a john boehner impersonator and hope you can learn to cry on cue. more coming up later. >>> first, we want to get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. just four days after suffering its most devastating natural disaster ever, japan is now potentially facing the worst nuclear accident since chernobyl. in total, there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country. this crisis largely centers around one complex. it's about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. the crippled fukushima power plant. high levels of radiation leaked from the facility this morning after a third reactor was rocked by an explosion and a fourth caught fire. in a brief address to that nation today, the country's prime minister urged calm but said there was a "very high risk of further leakage." after an emergency cabinet meeting, the japanese cabinet warned 140,000 people living within roughly 1
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
:30 at 5:00 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. the world is watching a small crew of technicians in japan this morning. we're being called the country's last line of defense. trying to prevent an all-out nuclear cans th nucle nuclear catastrophe. the group of 50 were forced out of the fukushima plant for nearly an hour after a dangerous spike of radiation that authorities fear put their lives at risk. one of the best descriptions came from this paper. says -- describe them as faceless crew in the times. they crawl through labyrinths of equipment and other darknesses pierced by flashlights listening for periodic explosions and wore white full body jump suits that provide scant protection from the invisible radiation sleelting through their bodies. consider that, the plight of the 50 individuals. the workers that have been dousing reactors with seawater in a frantic effort to stabilize the temperature there is are being asked to endure up to five times the maximum radiation exposure allowed for american nuclear power plants. today's elevated levels were apparently the result of yet another
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may
, on japan, where it's 2:00 a.m. and the fight to head off a nuclear meltdown could go either way at this hour. welcome to "america live," everyone. i'm megyn kelly. we've been getting reports all day of growing worries about radiation levels around that damaged nuclear plant. take a look at the images just in to "america live." hundreds of men, women, children, even animals, lining up one by one, waiting to be tested for possible exposure to radiation. the doctors using special equipment to scan individuals head to toe. there are reports that u.s. military personnel aiding in relief efforts are also being exposed to radiation. meantime, a dramatic situation is playing out at the damaged nuke site. we're told that at least 50 workers being described as many as heroic are risking their own lives by staying behind to monitor the situation and try to keep cooling levels in effect. u.s. nuclear officials and international atomic energy agency warning that the safety shield surrounding the nuclear fuel may have been breached. that has more than 140,000 nearby residents locked down insi
in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10,000 have died in his province alone. and as the search goes on for victims, at least a thousand washed up on shore today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
. "first look" is up next. >>> desperate measures. the world watches and waits as japan tries to contain its nuclear crisis. survival instinct, incredible new video of heroic rescues during the craftic tsunami. and royal jewel, the see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a whopping sum. good morning. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more on "first look" on msnbc. today, we begin with a race against the clock. japan is desperately trying to reconnect power to critical cooling systems at the fukushima power plant. this as smoke has once again been seen rising from the crippled nuclear facility. today high-capacity fire engines are blasting tons of water into the hot zone, an unexplained switch from yesterday's air attacks. >> reporter: tons of water, the difference between salvation and catastrophe at japan's stricken nuclear plant. >> the situation remains very serious. but there's been no significant worsening since yesterday. >> reporter: the cloud billowing from the fukushima daichi plant on wednesday was all but gone thursday, but the possibility of a meltdown is still
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
northern japan, collapsing buildings, spawning fires, and causing a major tsunami that brings death and destruction to dozens of cities. that tsunami now moving across the pacific ocean. the entire west coast, from hawaii to alaska, is under a tsunami warning. this morning, we are live in japan with the very latest on the damage, and we'll tell you just how much of the u.s. could be at risk. "early" this friday morning, be at risk. "early" this friday morning, march 11th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> those pictures and that sound give you a very good idea of just what people in japan are dealing with this morning. those shots, of course, of the magnitude 8.9 quake which hit just about 2:46 local time. >> the images, as you can see, are devastating. and that quake triggered a tsunami. some waves reported as high as 30 feet high, and that wall of mud just sweeping away everything in its path right now. the death toll in the area is on the rise. buildings in tokyo, which are currently on fire right now, 4 million buildings in the region without power. so this is a devastating sit
chief for criticizing japan officials. the u.n. says, we have to wait for more news. that's what we'll do. jon: so much confusion and it doesn't help anyone. thanks for joining us. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: thanks, guys, this is a fox news alert. anger and frustration intensifying in japan's nuclear crisis right now. there are new reports that u.s. forces helping in relief efforts are being ordered to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled fukushima plant. you are looking at up-close video of the reactors, where conditions took a turn for the worse. a big jump in radiation levels forced the teams to leave the plant and abandon efforts to cool down the reactors. experts say that radiation has traveled far beyond the 20-mile radius. the pentagon assuring that u.s. forces will have to stay away unless they have special authorization. we're getting reports that evacuation shelters are running out of food and basic necessities. many victims reportedly furious over the government's response. trace gallagher picks up the story from there. trace? >> reporter: the
in japan isç "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
ideas, but they are specific things. and wh) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioacti
it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could have predicted that. but that hasn't stopped die-hard supporters from calling this a once-in-a-lifetime fluke
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' head quarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantç to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
will this nuclear crisis in japan get? all four reactors at the fukushima plant are damaged terrifying the local population. people are evacuating the area and even moving away from cities as far away as tokyo. out of 800 workers on the site of the nuclear plants, 50 are still there. only 50 and they are in a very dangerous situation. we'll get a report on the ground on how serious the situation is and what it could mean for americans here at home. >>> plus, how much radiation can anyone be exposed to before risking significant health problems? we'll talk to the experts about how much is too much. >>> i'm going to talk to the weather channel of all people about which direction the winds are now blowing and who is in harm's way. also no surprise here, calling for yet another war. this time it's libya. neocons are asking for a no-fly zone to force gadhafi from power. >>> if a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, how will little knowledge affect michelle bachmann's chances. even well known politician have scant knowledge of their own country's history. we start with the crisis in japan. david alb
the plume was coming and people were talking about it on the united states. but here in japan there are amounts that are significant enough to cause concern. as long as the reactors keep leaking, especially if it gets worse we will hear a lot of reports about contamination we. >> we will go burbank in just a second. do you have reports about what is being done to get the leaking nuclear reactors under control? do you know the latest? >> today has been the most encouraging news yet. there is electricity at two of the reactors and they are going to start in the next few hours to see if they can turn the pumps back on. and one of the reactors, the fire trucks we have seen, shot enough water, 1500 gallons of it today alone to fill up the tanks and cover the damaged fuel rods. that's big. and even bigger at two other reactors, diesel power generators have got the circulating system up and running. and that is actually brought measured temperatures down. so officials have cautiously optimistic that they are beginning to get this thing under control. and it's a race against time beca
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)